Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System!

I am continuing in January a series of blogs on human rights that I began in December: “Towards Human Rights.” The purpose of this blog series is to make the case for the implementation and acceptance of human rights as a global values system. It is based on my Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System?

 “…recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.”  Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948

Towards Human Rights as a Global Values System, part 16

 By Dr. Denise R. Ames

A History and Philosophy of Human Rights                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Ancient Greek Philosophers
“I am not an Athenian or a Greek, but a citizen of the world.” … Socrates

During the time period 470-322 BCE, the philosophers in ancient Greece – in particular Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle – began to articulate the concept of human rights that we know today. Instead of using the term human rights, however, many Greek philosophers used the term natural rights; these were rights they said came from natural law.

15.1 Socrates

Socrates

According to the Greek tradition, natural law reflected the natural order of the universe. These philosophers thought that nature set natural law and was everywhere. This natural order provided the basis for rational systems of justice and universal principles in order for humans to evaluate the moral authority of man-made laws. The Greek philosophers believed that these universal principles came from humans’ inborn sense of right and wrong, rather than governmental laws which were secondary in importance.

Natural law is the theory or belief that certain rights exist independently of any government’s granting of those rights. It was superior to laws passed by governments because man-made laws could be different in every society and carried out at the whim of rulers. Plato, Aristotle and others favored natural law and said that morality is not man-made but natural. All people must obey natural laws, whether or not government enacts them. Aristotle believed that natural law is the same truth everywhere, it was universal. It was the belief at the time that governments could apply general laws of nature as a system of justice for all societies, regardless of their culture or customs.

4 Parthenon

Greek Parthenon

This natural, moral law surpassed local legal codes.  For example, the reasoning leading to the formation of the Bill of Rights in England and the U.S. drew on the theory of natural law. Whenever a group rebels against their government and asserts rights that the government hasn’t granted them, they are claiming natural law. Those who drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights used the theory of natural law to justify their endeavors.

The concept of natural law was vague enough to keep philosophers busy trying to refine the idea for over 2,000 years. Ancient Greeks began to put natural laws into their law codes. They are remembered for their valuable contribution to the concept of human rights. The idea of natural law is very similar to the concept of human rights today and is considered valid for all humans around the world. Natural law is also superior to national or local laws when those laws overturn human rights laws.

About the Author:

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

1.5 bookPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more information about the topic of human rights see Dr. Ames’ book Human Rights: Towards a Global Values System, $17.95, 225 pgs. Also available on Amazon.

 

 

Posted in awareness, differences, diversity, History, human rights, perspectives, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System!

I am continuing in January a series of blogs on human rights that I began in December: “Towards Human Rights.” The purpose of this blog series is to make the case for the implementation and acceptance of human rights as a global values system. It is based on my Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System?

 “…recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.” Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948

Towards Human Rights as a Global Values System, part 15

By Dr. Denise R. Ames

A History and Philosophy of Human Rights
Confucianism, Part 2

The basic teachings of Confucianism stressed the importance of an individual’s moral 15.1 mapeducation so that moral principles would govern the state rather than harsh laws. Social harmony was the greatest goal of Confucianism; every individual needed to know his or her place in the social order. If the teaching of good behaviors is strong enough, it will completely influence the individual, and thus, each person will behave properly to avoid shame and “losing face.”

Confucius also helped establish a school that taught government rulers to have a strong sense of duty to the state. He promoted the idea of meritocracy, in which leadership is based on ability and talent rather than on class privilege or wealth.

15.2 Confucian scholars

Reenactment of Confucian scholars

This contributed to the introduction of the imperial examination system in China that allowed anyone, including poor peasants, to become a government officer, a position which brought wealth and honor to the whole family.

But the male student (no females) must first pass a rigorous written examination that took years of study, and only a few passed. The Chinese imperial examination system started around 165 BCE and grew over the centuries until it officially ended in 1905.

14.1 ConfuciusAnother concept in Confucianism is tolerance towards others. In fact, many people who practice Confucianism are also Buddhist, Taoist, Muslim, or Christian. The idea was that all religions have something important to say. No one specific religion can be completely correct and know everything, and thus, everyone can learn from another’s point of view.

In his lifetime, Confucius lived a simple life and never knew the impact of his teachings. It wasn’t until years after his death that China and East Asia began to adopt Confucianism. Even today, Confucian teachings are influential in China and East Asia.

About the Author:

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

1.5 book

Please email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more information about the topic of human rights see Dr. Ames’ book Human Rights: Towards a Global Values System, $17.95, 225 pgs. Also available on Amazon.

 

 

Posted in differences, diversity, Global Community, History, human rights, perspectives, Public blog, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System!

I am continuing in January a series of blogs on human rights that I began in December: “Towards Human Rights.” The purpose of this blog series is to make the case for the implementation and acceptance of human rights as a global values system. It is based on my Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System?

 “…recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.” …Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948

 Towards Human Rights as a Global Values System, part 14

 By Dr. Denise R. Ames

A History and Philosophy of Human Rights,

Confucianism, Part 1

Based on the teachings of the Chinese philosopher Confucius (551–479 BCE), Confucianism is a Chinese ethical and philosophical system that focuses on human14.1 Confucius morality and wrong action. Confucius lived during the Chou dynasty in China, an era known for its moral slackness. His parents died when he was a child, leaving him alone in the world. Later in life, he wandered through China, giving advice to the rulers. A small band of dedicated students followed him during this time. He spent the last years of his life teaching and died around the age of 72.

During Confucius’ lifetime, China was in a constant state of upheaval and wars. Confucius believed that at this time China needed a strict set of rules and standards to guide people in proper behavior. He stated that the ideal person needed to exhibit good moral character, and respect his leader, ancestors and father. He also thought the ideal person needed to think for himself in order to discover what was right and wrong.

Confucius directed his teachings to males; females were not important to him. He encouraged the leaders of China to live their lives in a good, moral manner, and to set a good example as role models for their people. He believed the country would run much more smoothly if it followed his teachings.

14.2

Analects of Confucius

Confucius, like Socrates, did not write down his teachings, but the second generation of Confucius followers collected his teachings into the Analects, the most honored of his texts. His writings dealt primarily with individual morality and ethics, and the proper use of political power by the rulers. It is a complex system of moral, social, political, philosophical, and somewhat religious thought that has influenced the culture and history of East Asia. The Confucian version of the Ethic of Reciprocity, or the Golden Rule was: “What you do not wish for yourself, do not do to others.”

Confucius never stated whether man was born good or evil, noting that “by nature men are similar; by practice men are wide apart.” Therefore, they must study and practice the right values: Li, respectability and good manners; Hsiao, love within the family, love of parents and parental love for their children; Yi, righteousness; Xin, honesty and trust; Jen, compassion, humaneness (the highest Confucian value); and Chung, loyalty to the state.

About the Author:

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

1.5 bookPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more information about the topic of human rights see Dr. Ames’ book Human Rights:Towards a Global Values System, $17.95, 225 pgs. Also available on Amazon.

 

 

Posted in awareness, cultural divide, differences, diversity, Global Community, History, human rights, perspectives, Public blog, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System!

I am continuing in January a series of blogs on human rights that I began in December: “Towards Human Rights.” The purpose of this blog series is to make the case for the implementation and acceptance of human rights as a global values system. It is based on my Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System?

 “…recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.” Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948

 Towards Human Rights as a Global Values System, part 13

 By Dr. Denise R. Ames

A History and Philosophy of Human Rights
“Every religion emphasizes human improvement, love, respect for others, sharing other people’s suffering. On these lines every religion had more or less the same viewpoint and the same goal.” …Dali Lama (Tibetan Buddhism

Buddhism, Part 2

Buddhism is a collection of beliefs and practices. In this brief overview are a few of the Buddhist traditions – ethical conduct, morality, behaviors, practices, and traditions – that12.2 Enlightened Buddha are closely tied to human rights. Buddhism has organized many of its ethical and moral teachings into numbered groups.

The Three Trainings or Practices of Buddhism

  1. Sila: Virtue, good conduct, and morality are based on two principles: equality, all living entities are equal, and reciprocity, to do onto others as you would wish them to do onto you.
  2. Samadhi: Concentration and meditation develops the mind and is the path to wisdom, which in turn leads to personal freedom, and is essential in maintaining good conduct.
  3. Prajna: Judgment, insight, wisdom, and enlightenment are the real heart of Buddhism. Wisdom will emerge if the mind is pure and calm.

13.2 Four Noble Truths

The Four Noble Truths of Buddhism

  1. Suffering is real and has many causes, such as loss, sickness, pain, failure, rejection, the impermanence of pleasure, and unsatisfied desires.
  2. The cause of suffering is the desire to have and control things and takes many forms, such as craving sensual pleasures, desire for fame, and desire to avoid unpleasant sensations, like fear, anger or jealousy.
  3. There is an end to suffering which stops with final enlightenment. The mind experiences complete freedom, and lets go of any desire or craving.
  4. In order to end suffering, one must follow the Eightfold Path.

13.3 Eight fold path

The Eightfold Path

  1. Right Understanding of the Four Noble Truths.
  2. Right Thinking: following the right path in life.
  3. Right Speech: no lying, criticism, condemning, gossip, harsh language.
  4. Right Conduct (see the Five Precepts below).
  5. Right Livelihood; support yourself without harming others.
  6. Right Effort: promote good thoughts; conquer evil thoughts.
  7. Right Mindfulness: become aware of your body, mind and feelings.
  8. Right Concentration: meditate to achieve a higher state of consciousness.

The five precepts (teachings) are Buddhist ethical practice. Scholars often compare them with the Ten Commandments of Christianity; however, the precepts are different in that they are to be taken as recommendations, not commandments. This means the individual is encouraged to use his/her own intelligence to apply these rules in the best possible way instead of commanding behavior. The five precepts are rules to live by; like training rules that if followed they can help a person live a life of happiness, helpfulness, and meditation.

Five Precepts in Buddhism

  1. avoid harming living beings (practice non-violence)
  2. avoid taking things not freely given (not committing theft)
  3. avoid sensual (sexual) misconduct
  4. avoid lying (speaking truth always)
  5. avoid intoxicating drinks, drugs, which lead to loss of mindfulness

12.1 bUDDHAFrom this brief description, we can see that Buddhism focuses less attention on individualism and more emphasis on others. But the Dalai Lama (Tibetan Buddhism) feels that human rights are in harmony with the moral values of traditional Buddhism and provides a useful way for expressing Buddhist views on today’s political and social issues.

About the Author:

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

1.5 bookPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more information about the topic of human rights see Dr. Ames’ book Human Rights:Towards a Global Values System, $17.95, 225 pgs. Also available on Amazon.

 

 

Posted in awareness, cultural divide, differences, diversity, Global Community, History, human rights, perspectives, Public blog, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System!

I am continuing in January a series of blogs on human rights that I began in December: “Towards Human Rights.” The purpose of this blog series is to make the case for the implementation and acceptance of human rights as a global values system. It is based on my Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System?

“…recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.” …Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948

Towards Human Rights as a Global Values System, part 12

 By Dr. Denise R. Ames

A History and Philosophy of Human Rights
“Every religion emphasizes human improvement, love, respect for others, sharing other people’s suffering. On these lines every religion had more or less the same viewpoint and the same goal.” … Dali Lama (Tibetan Buddhism)
Buddhism

Buddhism currently has about 365 million followers and is the world’s 4th largest religion after Christianity, Islam and Hinduism. Little is known of the founder’s, 12.1 bUDDHASiddhartha Gautama (563-460 BCE), early life and no scribe wrote his biography during his lifetime. According to tradition, Siddhartha was born a prince in Kalinga, India.

As in the case with other religious leaders, miraculous stories described his birth to his mother, Maya, and father, the king of the Śãkyas clan. In one legend, he emerged from his mother’s side without causing her any pain. In another legend, the earth shook at his birth and as a newborn, he was showered with water. His family named him Siddhãrtha, the “one who has achieved his aim,” and Gautama was his clan name.

Raised as a Hindu, Siddhartha’s parents thought he would follow in his father’s footsteps as king. But his parents were deeply troubled by a prediction from a fortune teller, who said at his birth that he would either become a great monarch or a monk and a great

12.2 Departure of Sihartha

Departure of Siddhartha

religious teacher. They wanted Siddhartha to follow into the kingship rather than into the life of a monk, so his parents raised him in a state of comfort and encouraged him to attach to earthly desires and pleasure. At the age of 16, he married his wife Yaśodharã and at the age of 29 they had their first son.

Shortly after his son’s birth, Siddhartha fell into an intensely troubled state when he spotted a helpless, elderly man suffering from advanced disease and a grieving family carrying the dead body of a family member to a cremation site. He reflected deeply upon the suffering brought about by old age, illness, and death and had a vision of a religious monk who led a calm life of meditation. These visions pushed him to follow the path of a monk and seek a spiritual solution to life’s problems brought about by human suffering. He left his wife, child, luxurious lifestyle, and future role as king in order to seek truth. It was not an unusual practice at the time for some men to leave their families and lead the life of a monk.

He first tried meditation, and learned this valuable skill. However, meditation did not

12.3 Emaciated Buddha

Emaciated Buddha

last forever. He then joined a group of other monks in a forest where he practiced breath control and fasted intensely for six years. He skirted the edge of death by only eating a few grains of rice each day, but after suffering great physical pain, he abandoned this path. He realized that neither of the extremes he experienced would lead to enlightenment. Instead, he found the path to enlightenment – a state of freedom and release from suffering – was to pursue a middle way. For him, practicing moderation and meditation was the middle way.

One night, while seated underneath a large Bodhi tree, he experienced major spiritual breakthroughs and attained enlightenment – now he was known as “The Buddha” (the Awakened One). For seven days after his enlightenment he puzzled over his future:

12.2 Enlightened Buddha

Enlightened Buddha

whether to withdraw from the world and live a life of isolation or whether to reenter the world and teach his Middle Way. He decided to share his teachings with others. He wandered through Northeast India for decades, teaching all who would listen, eventually drawing tens of thousands of followers.

He later established an order of monks and nuns. His wife Yaśodharã became the first nun. In his late 70s, his health began to fail. After 45 years of teaching, he died of natural causes in a small town, Kuśinagara, at the age of 80.

About the Author:

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

1.5 bookPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more information about the topic of human rights see Dr. Ames’ book Human Rights:Towards a Global Values System, $17.95, 225 pgs. Also available on Amazon.

 

 

Posted in awareness, differences, diversity, human rights, perspectives, Public blog, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System!

I am continuing in January a series of blogs on human rights that I began in December: “Towards Human Rights.” The purpose of this blog series is to make the case for the implementation and acceptance of human rights as a global values system. It is based on my Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System?

 “…recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.” Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948

Towards Human Rights as a Global Values System, part 11

By Dr. Denise R. Ames

A History and Philosophy of Human Rights
“Every religion emphasizes human improvement, love, respect for others, sharing other people’s suffering. On these lines every religion had more or less the same viewpoint and the same goal.” …Dali Lama (Tibetan Buddhism)

The Persian Empire: The Cyrus Cylinder

Following the Persian conquest of Babylon in 539 BCE, the Persian emperor Cyrus the

11.1 Cyrus the Great

Cyrus the Great

Great (600-530 BCE) issued a document written on a clay cylinder called the Cyrus Cylinder. The writing on the cylinder describes how Cyrus had improved the lives of the citizens of Babylonia, sent home lost peoples and rebuilt temples and religious shrines.

At the time, the victors in battle massacred the defeated people and looted their homes. Cyrus broke with this cruel tradition and treated his newly conquered subjects with tolerance, moderation and generosity, although self-interest may certainly have influenced his peace-making policy. As stated on the cylinder and in the Bible, one of Cyrus’ acts of tolerance was that he allowed some Jews living in Babylon to return to their homeland. He also financed the rebuilding of the Jewish temple in Jerusalem.

Some modern scholars call the Cyrus cylinder “the world’s first declaration of human rights.” Iranian scholar Reza Shabani reasons that the cylinder “discusses human rights in a way unique for the era, dealing with ways to protect the honor, prestige, and religious beliefs

11.2 Cyrus Cylinder

Cyrus Cylinder

of all the nations dependent to Iran in those days.” The Cyrus Cylinder contributed to the body of ideas that helped create our modern concepts of human rights.

About the Author:

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

1.5 bookPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more information about the topic of human rights see Dr. Ames’ book Human Rights: Towards a Global Values System, $17.95, 225 pgs. Also available on Amazon.

 

 

 

 

Posted in awareness, differences, diversity, History, human rights, perspectives, Public blog, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Human Rights: Happy 71st Birthday!

December is Human Rights Month and December 10 is Human Rights Day. It is observed every year on this day since 1948 when the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

In recognition of this notable achievement, for the month of December I will be posting a series of blogs, “Towards Human Rights.” The purpose of this blog series is to make the case for the implementation and acceptance of human rights as a global values system. It is based on my Human Rights: Towards a Universal Values System?

“…recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.” … Preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948

Towards Human Rights as a Global Values System, part 10

 By Dr. Denise R. Ames

A History and Philosophy of Human Rights: The Judeo-Christian Tradition                                                                                                                                            

Judaism is a religious tradition that has contributed to the body of human rights. The three monotheistic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—believe that only one 10.1 JudaismGod exists. The early followers of Judaism believed that each person can have a personal relationship with God and that he is both merciful and loving, as well as metes out punishment to those who disobey his commands. Also important is the idea of individual worth, which is different from the emphasis on the group. The concept of individualism, important in the West, had its roots in the Judeo-Christian tradition.

Obedience to the law of God became a key element of Judaic beliefs. Although each person had the ability to choose between good and evil, no person could devise his/her own ethical and moral standards. People had to follow certain standards. According to the Judeo-Christian tradition, God made known his commandments, his ideals of right behavior, to Moses on Mount of Sinai around 1380 BCE.

The Ten Commandments, according to tradition, were etched onto two stone tablets to

10.2 Ten Commandments

Ten Commandments

show their unchanging nature. They are a list of religious and moral rules that Judeo-Christians accept as God’s ethical standards;  if not then punishment and suffering will follow. Judaism and Christianity accept the Ten Commandments as their moral foundation, and they are important to Islam as well. Various religious groups translate and divide the Ten Commandments differently; the following is the Catholic/Lutheran shortened version.

The Ten Commandments
1.  I am the Lord your God, You shall have no other gods before me.
2.  You shall not make wrongful use of the name of your God.
3.  Remember the Sabbath and keep it holy.
4.  Honor your father and mother.
5.  You shall not murder (kill).
6.  You shall not commit adultery.
7.  You shall not steal.
8.  You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.
9.  You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife.
10. You shall not covet anything that belongs to your neighbor.  End]

About the Author:

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

1.5 bookPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more information about the topic of human rights see Dr. Ames’ book Human Rights: Towards a Global Values System, $17.95, 225 pgs. Also available on Amazon.

 

Posted in awareness, differences, diversity, Global Community, History, human rights, perspectives, Public blog, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment