Lessons from the Trickster Archetype, Part 5:  Trump the Trickster?

2.1 KokopelliWhy can’t we just get along? This is a question that I have been working on in my new book, Divided: Five Colliding Worldviews and How to Navigate Them. I would like to share with you some ideas that I have been exploring.

Join me in learning about the trickster archetype in this series of blogs. The trickster is surfacing today in our uncertain times. What does the trickster represent and what can we learn from him?

Beware of the Trickster

We are living in uncertain times. Our divisions seem to be intractable. It is a time for us to be attuned to strange occurrences and alert to messages from questionable leaders. Tricksters are most visible when people are in conflict and trauma, whether on an individual, national or local level. Now is such a time!

President Trump: Our Trickster Archetype, Part 2

The trickster is a universal archetypal figure found through the history of humanity. 3.1 President Donald TrumpPsychologist Carl Jung coined the term archetype and defined it as universal, archaic patterns and images that derive from the collective unconscious.  The trickster is one of the most reoccurring of the many archetypes found across time.

Trump, the trickster archetype, promises to heal, to make things great again, to perform magic, to raise the dead, all these services for the common good. Trump sells the impossible, the great illusion, but only if he is in charge; the trickster is always a one-person show.

Trump is deceptive, a con man and an expert in assigning blame. Things are never his1.2 Briar Rabbit fault. He rarely says he is sorry, feels little guilt, and is not ashamed of any of his actions. The trickster maneuvers to control almost all situations.

Any time a utopia is being promised by political leaders, then the trickster is riding shotgun. Thus, the time is ripe for a trickster figure to emerge to soothe our discomfort or enrage us to the point of despair.

Trickster thrives on comfort-induced inattention and vanity-induced unawareness, and has essentially a free hand in guiding those who refuse to ever question their motives, assumptions, and beliefs.

 

About the Author:

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

wviewscoverPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more about worldviews see Dr. Ames’ book Five Worldviews: How We See the World. $9.95

 

 

 

Posted in archetype, awareness, cultural divide, differences, diversity, indigenous, mythology, Nature, perspectives, populism, Public blog, trickster, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Lessons from the Trickster Archetype, Part 4:  Trump the Trickster?

1.2Why can’t we just get along? This is a question that I have been working on in my new book, Divided: Five Colliding Worldviews and How to Navigate Them. I would like to share with you some ideas that I have been exploring.

Join me in learning about the trickster archetype in this series of blogs. The trickster is surfacing today in our uncertain times. What does the trickster represent and what can we learn from him?

Beware of the Trickster

We are living in uncertain times. Our divisions seem to be intractable. It is a time for us to be attuned to strange occurrences and alert to messages from questionable leaders. Tricksters are most visible when people are in conflict and trauma, whether on an individual, national or local level. Now is such a time!

President Trump: Our Trickster Archetype, Part 1

The trickster is a universal archetypal figure found through the history of humanity. Psychologist Carl Jung coined the term archetype and defined it as universal, archaic patterns and images that derive from the collective unconscious.  The trickster is one of the most reoccurring of the many archetypes found across time.

Tricksters are always around. But Americans have invited the trickster archetype into our midst in the form of Donald Trump, our trickster president. Why has our society 3.1 President Donald Trumpinvited a trickster figure like Donald Trump into the inner circles of power? Trump has legitimately seized power and established an audience of millions of people because we are in a historical situation where fear, confusion, uncertainty and the loss of a sense of home are real.

Trump is far from the only trickster character around the globe, but because of the wealth and influence of the U.S., he is the most noticeable and important. Because of uncertainty today, current world politics are increasingly influenced by trickster figures. Because of their influence, we now have no idea what will happen to us.1.4

Both the trickster archetype and President Trump share a commitment to spontaneity and improvisation that always pushes the envelope. Trump clearly enjoys his role as cultural destroyer. He seems determined to break every rule and overturn every norm. Trump as the trickster is more interested in images than issues. Perhaps one of the reasons he has been able to elude criticism by his supporters, is that much of his behavior is primal, unconscious and fed by archetypal forces. It is slippery and ephemeral, hard to pin down.

 

About the Author:

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

wviewscoverPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more about worldviews see Dr. Ames’ book Five Worldviews: How We See the World. $9.95

 

 

 

Posted in archetype, awareness, cultural divide, differences, diversity, indigenous, mythology, organized crime, perspectives, politics, populism, trickster, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lessons from the Trickster Archetype:  Who is the Trickster? Part 3

1.1Why can’t we just get along? This is a question that I have been working on in my new book, Divided: Five Colliding Worldviews and How to Navigate Them. I would like to share with you some ideas that I have been exploring.

Join me in learning about the trickster archetype in this series of blogs. The trickster is surfacing today in our uncertain times. What does the trickster represent and what can we learn from him?

Beware of the Trickster

We are living in uncertain times. Our divisions seem to be intractable. It is a time for us to be attuned to strange occurrences and alert to messages from questionable leaders. Tricksters are most visible when people are in conflict and trauma, whether on an individual, national or local level. Now is such a time!

The Trickster Archetype, Part 3

The trickster is a universal archetypal figure found through the history of humanity. Psychologist Carl Jung coined the term archetype and defined it as universal, archaic patterns and images that derive from the collective unconscious.  The trickster is one of1.5 the most reoccurring of the many archetypes found across time.

The trickster is fun, funny and frustrating. He is a joker and prankster, the best of companions, but also a thief, a liar and an impostor; a figure of shadow and night. He takes what is expected and turns it upside down, usually for his own benefit. An example of a trickster in ancient mythology is in the Norse pantheon, the shape-shifting trickster character of Loki, god of mischief and lies.

The trickster manages to impose himself, not because of his real qualities, nor by enabling the people around him, but by blurring distinctions. The trickster often creates and enjoys chaos. Rather than making clear the difference between truth and lie, the trickster thrives in ambivalence.

1.4While presenting himself as a solution to the crisis, he actually perpetuates insecurity by blurring boundaries and undermining the very sense of distinction and judgment. In fact, the trickster is not really interested in solving the crisis. His real interest lies in perpetuating conditions of confusion, the world he thrives in.

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

wviewscoverPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more about worldviews see Dr. Ames’ book Five Worldviews: How We See the World. $9.95

 

 

 

 

Posted in archetype, awareness, cultural divide, differences, diversity, indigenous, mythology, perspectives, trickster, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lessons from the Trickster Archetype:  Who is the Trickster? Part 2

Why can’t we just get along? This is a question that I have been working on in my new book, Divided: Five Colliding Worldviews and How to Navigate Them. I would like to share with you some ideas that I have been exploring.

Join me in learning about the trickster archetype in this series of blogs. The trickster is surfacing today in our uncertain times. What does the trickster represent and what can we learn from him?

2.1 Kokopelli

Kokopelli, Trickster found in Native America, Southwest US

Beware of the Trickster

We are living in uncertain times. Our divisions seem to be intractable. It is a time for us to be attuned to strange occurrences and alert to messages from questionable leaders. Tricksters are most visible when people are in conflict and trauma, whether on an individual, national or local level. Now is such a time!

 

The Trickster Archetype, Part 2

The trickster is a universal archetypal figure found through the history of humanity. Eminent psychologist Carl Jung coined the term archetype and defined it as universal, archaic patterns and images that derive from the collective unconscious.  The trickster is one of the most reoccurring of the many archetypes found across time.1.1

The trickster is represented as thievish, deceitful, parricidal, incestuous, and cannibalistic. In any role, the trickster usually represents the force of cunning, and is pitted against opponents who are stronger or more powerful.

The trickster seems to be a comedy of opposites. For every good aspect of his persona there is an equal and opposite aspect. He takes on different personas or puts on acts depending on the audience or on what they need. He is the breaker of taboos. And he will pull off elaborate schemes to teach a moral lesson or expose the folly of men.

He is often very good with words and uses them to trick or fool others and to make up for his other shortcomings, such as physical or moral weakness. He is also a mime, telling people whatever they would like to hear. The trickster holds no real knowledge but practices a cunning intelligence.1.2

The trickster openly questions and mocks convention and encourages other characters to follow their impulses, to do what is fun or what feels good rather than what is right. He is a figure of excess, especially when it comes to eating, drinking, and sexual exploits.

About the Author

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

wviewscoverPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more about worldviews see Dr. Ames’ book Five Worldviews: How We See the World. $9.95

 

Posted in archetype, awareness, cultural divide, differences, diversity, mythology, perspectives, trickster, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lessons from the Trickster Archetype:  Who is the Trickster? Part 1

Why can’t we just get along? This is a question that I have been working on in my new book, Divided: Five Colliding Worldviews and How to Navigate Them. I would like to share with you some ideas that I have been exploring.

Join me in learning about the trickster archetype in this series of 8 blogs. The trickster is surfacing today in our uncertain times. What does the trickster represent and what can we learn from him?

Beware of the Trickster
1.1We are living in uncertain times. Our divisions seem to be intractable. It is a time for us to be attuned to strange occurrences and alert to messages from questionable leaders. Tricksters are most visible when people are in conflict and trauma, whether on an individual, national or local level. Now is such a time!

The Trickster Archetype, Part 1

The trickster is a universal archetypal figure found through the history of humanity. Eminent psychologist Carl Jung coined the term archetype and defined it as universal, archaic patterns and images that derive from the collective unconscious. They are inherited potentials which are actualized when they enter consciousness as images or manifest in behavior upon interaction with the outside world.

Archetypes are familiar to us as they surface in cultural and religious literature, such as myths, fairy tales and assorted legends. Many of us have encountered these archetypes

1.2 Briar Rabbit

Brer Rabbit

in ordinary people, which connect all human beings and cultures around the world.

Through his research, Jung found 12 primary (although there are many) mythic characters or archetypes that he believed resided in the collective unconscious of humanity. A few of the most reoccurring archetypes are the hero, sage, lover, explorer, caregiver, ruler, innocent, and the trickster.

 

Each trickster is unique to its culture, but all tricksters are bound by certain characteristics. The trickster archetype can be cunning or foolish or both. Tricksters are usually male characters, and are fond of crossing and breaking social norms and conventional behavior, boasting, and playing tricks.10.2

He is the wise-fool who openly questions and mocks authority, pokes fun at the overly serious, creates convoluted schemes that may or may not work, plays with the laws of the universe, and is sometimes his own worst enemy. He violates principles of the social and natural order, playfully disrupting normal life and then re-establishing it on a new basis.

 

About the Author

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

wviewscoverPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more about worldviews see Dr. Ames’ book Five Worldviews: How We See the World. $9.95

 

Posted in awareness, cultural divide, differences, diversity, indigenous, perspectives, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Insights: The Traditional Worldview: The Traditionalist Worldview, Part 21

by Dr. Denise R. Ames

Why can’t we just get along? This is a question that I have been working on in my new book, Divided: Colliding Ways We See the World. This series of blogs looks at five worldviews that each have defining characteristics. Understanding the five worldviews—indigenous, traditional, progressive, globalized, and transformative—is a necessity in this complex and rapidly-changing world. The next several weeks I will be examining the traditional worldview, an often misunderstood and demonized worldview. I would like to share with you some ideas that I have been exploring.

“Tradition is a guide and not a jailer.”  ― W. Somerset Maugham

Concluding Insights: The Traditional Worldview

Even though it is usually thought that fundamentalists are set on returning their religion to its historic roots of the past, actually these movements are of the time and could not have taken place at any other time than our own. As mentioned above, fundamentalism01 traditions can be seen as another post-modern rejection of modernity. Fundamentalists are not what we traditionally think of as conservative; indeed many are anti-orthodox and regard the more conventional faithful as part of the problem.

These fundamentalist movements have sprung up autonomously, and each has its own idea of religious belief.  However, they bear commonalities and are similar to the pattern set by American Protestant fundamentalism, the earliest of these movements. Armstrong explains, “All are initially defensive movements rooted in a profound fear of obliteration, which causes them to develop a mistrustful vision of the “enemy.” They begin as intra-faith movements, and only at a secondary stage, if at all, do they direct their attention to a foreign foe.”

Fundamentalists often see the choices as to the organization of their nation as limited to a modern society or one based on the traditions of an imaginary past. 13.2Since they reject a modern society, the only other choice they see is the preservation of their traditional ways. Also many people in modern nations find that traditional values give resolute comfort and reassurance in a fluctuating and inexplicable world.

Therefore, many people from the Middle East to India to the United States find that the familiar traditions of the past give meaning, identity, and steadfastness to their lives. The essence of many of these traditional beliefs continues today and is zealously held by millions, if not billions, of people throughout the world.

Fundamentalists fear modernity and the disrupting influences of globalization and know 19.2 prayerthat some adversaries vow to destroy religion. They have found that their religion has provided them the sole guarantee of certainty in an increasingly uncertain and complex world. They will fight to their death to defend this certainty.

The traditional worldview is made up of different types of conservatism: political conservatives, populist right, alt-right, and fundamentalists. Often these four types can meld together and form a political and economic coalition that unites these disparate groups into a common cause.

About the Author

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

wviewscoverPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more about worldviews see Dr. Ames’ book Five Worldviews: How We See the World. $9.95

 

Posted in awareness, cultural divide, differences, diversity, History, perspectives, populism, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Expansion of World Fundamentalism, Part 1: The Traditionalist Worldview, Part 20

by Dr. Denise R. Ames

Why can’t we just get along? This is a question that I have been working on in my new book, Divided: Colliding Ways We See the World. This series of blogs looks at five worldviews that each have defining characteristics. Understanding the five worldviews—indigenous, traditional, progressive, globalized, and transformative—is a necessity in this complex and rapidly-changing world. The next several weeks I will be examining the traditional worldview, an often misunderstood and demonized worldview. I would like to share with you some ideas that I have been exploring.

“Tradition is a guide and not a jailer.”  ― W. Somerset Maugham

The Expansion of World Fundamentalism: The 1970s, Part 1

Those who advocated for a rational, secular, modern worldview spoke too hastily of the death of religion. This became apparent when a dramatic religious uprising occurred in

20 Iranian Revolution

Iranian Revolution 1979

the late 1970s. From 1978-1979, the Western world watched as an obscure ayatollah brought down the government of Shah Muhammad Reza Pahlavi in Iran, which had seemed to be one of the most modern and stable nations in the Middle East.

 

At the same time as governments applauded the peace initiative of President Anwar al Sadat of Egypt, observers noticed that young Egyptians were donning Islamic dress, casting aside the trappings of modernity, and engaging in a seizure of university campuses in order to reclaim them for religion—in a way that was reminiscent of student rebellions during the 1960s.

In the U.S., Jerry Falwell established the Moral Majority in 1979, urging Protestant fundamentalists to get politically involved and to challenge any state or federal 20.2 moral majoritylegislation that supported a “secular humanist” agenda. In Israel, fundamentalists proclaimed Israel to be a religious state.

Religious extremism emerged in regions where a secular, Western-style government had separated religion and politics. Its cohorts were resolute in dragging God and/or religion from the sidelines of modern culture and back to center field. It echoed a widespread disenchantment with modern culture. People all over the world were demonstrating that they wanted to see religion more openly reflected in public life, despite the derision heaped upon them by intellectuals and politicians.

Despite their intense dislike and distrust for each other, fundamentalist movements around the world share commonalities. They are quick to denounce people whom they regard as the enemies of God. Because fundamentalists feel under attack, they are distrustful and unwilling to consider any alternative point of view; this is yet another expression of intolerance that is a part of modernity. They take a hard line on what they regard as social morality.

Some modernizers have loudly called for the abolition of religion and have railed against it as the root of all problems; they have done so in the past and continue to do so. Fundamentalists’ movements begin with what they perceive as a real attack by followers

20.3 anti-religious sign

Anti-religion billboard

of liberal or mainstream religions or a secularist state, and more attacks simply make them more extreme. This was seen in the U.S. after media attacks in the wake of the Scopes trial; Jewish fundamentalism advanced after Hitler tried to exterminate European Jews and after the October War in 1973 when Arab armies launched a surprise attack against Israel.

In their anxiety and fear, fundamentalists often distort the faith they are trying to preserve. They are convinced that they are fighting for God but they can be highly selective in their reading of scripture. As Armstrong notes, for example, “Protestant fundamentalists quote from the book of Revelation at length and are stirred by its violent end-time vision but rarely refer

20.4 Sermon on the Mount

Jesus, Sermon on the Mount

to the Sermon on the Mount, where Jesus tells his followers to love their enemies, to turn the other cheek, and not to judge others. Jewish fundamentalists cite extensively from the Deuteronomy sections of the Bible and seem to overlook the rabbis’ command for charity. Muslim fundamentalists pointedly ignore the Qur’an’s numerous calls for peace, tolerance, and forgiveness, and extremists quote its more hard line verses to defend violence.”

About the Author

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator, grade 7-university, author of seven books, and president of an educational non-profit, Center for Global Awareness, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. CGA provides books, resources, and services with a holistic, global- focused, and perspective-taking approach for their three programs: Global Awareness for Educators, books and resources for educators and students grade 9-university; Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection, a self-organizing study and conversation program for adults focusing on seeing different perspectives of pressing global issues; and their most recent program Turn, Transformative Understanding and Reflection Network, which encourages lifelong and transformative learning to help us arrive at a place of personal and global well-being using a seven “path” approach.

wviewscoverPlease email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

For more about worldviews see Dr. Ames’ book Five Worldviews: How We See the World. $9.95

 

 

 

 

Posted in awareness, cultural divide, differences, diversity, perspectives, politics, Uncategorized, worldviews | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment