A New National Narrative: Concluding Insights of the Transformative Worldview

Today we conclude our blog series on the transformative worldview. For a review of the rest of this series, please visit the other articles through the following links: Part 1 (introduction), Part 2 (cultural patterns), Part 3 (political patterns), Part 4 (social patterns), Part 5 (economic patterns), and Part 6 (environmental patterns). Thank you for joining us as we explore this important way of seeing the world!

Events today pose a huge challenge for us: environmental degradation, a huge socioeconomic gap, unchecked individualism, a political system out of touch with reality, and worldviews unable to deal with future challenges. Our innate behaviors and historical experiences have not prepared us well for the urgency of the global issues that confront us; we do not have a firm track record that we can draw on. Our innate behaviors as a species have equipped us to deal with threats such as marauding lions or the needs of our immediate 25-member group, but now we must deal with the threat of planet-wide environmental devastation and the needs of our immediate 7+ billion–member group!

We often turn to our political or religious leaders as potential saviors. However, they are also overwhelmed with the issues, or they are caught in their own intransigent, outdated worldview. Our political leaders in the U.S. are adept (somewhat) at dealing with isolated problems in a legal, deliberative, cumbersome way, with built-in mechanisms to stymie impulsive actions. But they have failed to provide a vision of where we need to head and what we need to do. With their enslavement to corporations for their campaign donations, their intransigent bipartisanship, and their entrenched worldviews, many politicians are unable to provide the leadership the citizenry so desperately craves.34 President Donald Trump, US

The 2016 election in the U.S. of President Donald Trump was a rejection of many liberal democratic principles that the country and Western nations were founded upon. Half of the people in the U.S. voted for an authoritarian-type leader who is dispensing with the checks and balances carefully put in place over the years. They put their faith in a government run by wealthy oligarchs. Trump supporters are blithely rejecting our liberal traditions, just to cut through the bureaucracy and get results that benefit them. These political actions, unprecedented in U.S. history, are sure to have profound consequences.

Some of our religious leaders have also failed us, although many are working hard to bring about change. Many religious people, for example, have scoffed at the idea of climate change. However, some evangelical leaders are now alarmed that we humans are contaminating God’s creation and are calling for action. Other religious people continue to disbelieve the hard scientific findings. They are embedded in the minutiae of their faith and fail to see the “big picture” issues that are causing such distress around the world.  35 Religious Leaders

A challenge today and in the future is how to accommodate diverse opinions without losing social and national cohesiveness. There is a need to reduce the rigid dogma of fundamentalism, without losing the sense of shared meaning and purpose that traditional religion offers. There is a need to embrace the technological wonders of the globalized worldview that connect people throughout the world, yet reject the rampant consumerism and social divides that economic globalization fosters. There is a need to counter the pessimism, obscurity, elitism, and uninspiring and fragmenting effects of postmodern thought, without losing the ability to probe below surface meanings. What worldview will emerge to replace the shattered worldviews that have failed to provide a framework enabling us to address vast global problems?36 Village in Mexico, photo Denise Ames

One drawback to the transformative worldview is that many enthusiasts feel self-righteous about their “cause” and are unwilling to listen to others. The sanctimonious behavior among some has estranged people who otherwise might be drawn to worthy causes. While shouting tolerance and the rejection of hate, many have shown intolerance to views other than their own, especially on college campuses. That hardly makes for an inclusive movement! A willingness to listen and consider other views and people will do much to further many of the positive qualities of the transformative worldview.
37

Those supporting a transformative worldview need not totally disregard the other worldviews in shaping a new one, yet they need to be selective and mindful in fitting the values of the other worldviews into a new framework. Even though the traditional, modern, and globalized worldviews are the dominant paradigms at this point in time, the transformative worldview is gaining momentum and continues to mount a vigorous challenge to mainstream ideas, while offering viable options for a sustainable and more equitable future. Which worldview or combination of worldviews will global citizens choose for our future? While some people are already taking action, others are going through a process of debate, consideration, and deliberation. We all have a voice and critical stake in the outcome.

For many people, the transition to a new way of thinking and acting is a difficult one to make. But many are inspired to make the world livable and safe for our children and grandchildren. Although we eagerly install fluorescent lightbulbs or turn off our computers at night, deep structural, systemic changes are difficult to accomplish on our own. Our worldviews are embedded in the way society is structured; it is hard to make the leap to another worldview. Malcolm Gladwell described a “tipping point,” when things quickly make a dramatic shift to something different. The signals indicating that we need to shift to a different worldview are becoming ever more readily apparent. The leap to a transformative worldview is ever more urgent.  39 Tipping Point

It is essential to create a different worldview that can enable us to avert environmental collapse, deal with the myriad issues facing us today and in the near future, and forge a way of life that is happier and more fulfilling. Inspired by these goals, I have written my book Five Worldviews: How We See the World from a transformative worldview perspective, promoting it as a viable worldview today and in the future. After much research and reflection, I find that transformation is necessary to help us make the shift to a new way of thinking and acting that will move us into a new and more creative, tolerant, compassionate, and sustainable relationship with each other and our world.  40 Transcending worldviews

One step in formulating and expanding a transformative worldview is one that you have just accomplished: reading about worldviews. My goal is not for us to forcibly convert people to a transformative worldview. Rather, through listening, kindness, and compassionate conversations, we can actively demonstrate to others that the transformative worldview is a life-enhancing future scenario in which all people have a crucial stake. 41 no titleIt is my intent and hope that through engaging with others and seeing other perspectives, we can shift our consciousness to a transformative worldview. We can make that leap!

questions-to-consider

Questions to Consider
1.  Do you see the transformative worldview as a viable alternative worldview?


Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator and president of the nonprofit Center for Global Awareness. The Center for Global Awareness develops books and materials with a holistic, global focus for adult learners and educators. The CGA recently launched Gather, Global Awareness Through Engaged Reflection. In this unique program, adult learners form small study groups to launch conversations about pressing global issues. The simple acts of talking and listening allow us to see different perspectives, transcend deep political and cultural divides, and engage with others to create positive change. Please email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

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A New National Narrative: Environmental Patterns of the Transformative Worldview

Today’s blog considers the environmental patterns of the transformative worldview. For more in this seven-part series on the transformative worldview, please see Part 1 (introduction), Part 2 (cultural patterns), Part 3 (political patterns), Part 4 (social patterns), and Part 5 (economic patterns). Next week we will conclude this series with some final observations.

Those holding a transformative worldview treat the environment as not just an economic commodity. They feel that the Earth must be healthy to sustain humans and our fellow species. This view represents a shift in attitude that has been gaining momentum throughout the world. A new ecological awareness has awakened the perception of the interdependence of everything in nature, where every event has an effect on everything else.

Humans are seen as part of the mystery of the Universe and not isolated, separate, superior entities. With this awareness comes responsibility, along with an urgency to repair the damage done to the environment and halt further environmental destruction. Even tourism has taken an ecological turn for many travelers who opt for popular ecotourism destinations such as Costa Rica and Belize. Ecotourism involves visiting fragile, pristine, and relatively undeveloped natural areas; it is intended as a low-impact and small-scale alternative to large-scale commercial tourism. 29 Ecostourism in Costa Rica

The human population grew exponentially in the 20th century and continues to be an urgent issue in the 21st century. The carrying capacity of the Earth is severely strained by our current population. Will our Earth be able to sustain 9 to 12 billion people, a number projected to occur around 2050? If those future billions have a lifestyle like Americans today, the capacity for the Earth to provide resources will be severely compromised. 30

The dire consequences of climate change have galvanized millions of people adhering to a transformative worldview to work toward alternative and renewable energy, especially in the form of wind and solar energy. Our fossil fuel–dependent lifestyle has finally brought world-wide attention, even among some Western politicians, as a shift from our addiction to oil and coal is slowly underway. Events such as the first Earth Day in 1970, the Rio Environmental Conference in 1992, the Kyoto Treaty in 2001, the Copenhagen Climate Conference in 2009, and the United Nations Climate Change Conference in 2015 address the importance of a safe, healthy environment for sustainable human life. A growing number of people think it is of utmost importance to save the planet from environmental ravages.

A connected issue to energy, urban revitalization, is forcing many of us to rethink our car-dependent city configurations and accompanying suburban sprawl. Because of the excessive amounts of energy used to maintain this way of life, efforts are underway to switch to more energy-efficient modes of public transportation. Additionally, the alienating nature of suburbs has sparked rethinking among some people and a movement toward more community-focused neighborhoods that reduce commuting time and conserve valuable suburban land for agriculture and biodiversity.  31

Some ecologists suggest replacing the current economic measurement method—gross domestic product (GDP), which merely measures national spending without regard to economic, environmental, or social well-being—with a genuine progress indicator (GPI). The GPI, created by the organization Redefining Progress in 1995, measures the general economic and social well-being of all citizens. For example, if a business is responsible for an oil spill, the costs associated with the cleanup contribute to an increase in GDP, since the cleanup costs actually grow the economy, according to this measurement. But GDP ignores the environmental damage of the oil spill, which has a negative long-lasting cost and impact. In calculating the GPI, the costs of the oil spill would be subtracted from the total, since it damages the environment over the long-term. When using GPI calculations, the U.S. economy has been stagnant since 1970.i 32

A growing number of ecologists see the Earth as an interconnected organism that awakens our sacred relationship with nature and positively supports our psychic well-being. This shift of consciousness revives an ancient mystical accord with nature that has sustained humans for millions of years. A modern worldview has contributed to a destructive relationship with the Earth. Some people feel that a more benign connection would improve human health and mental well-being, as well as prevent the extinction of many endangered species, which add to the diversity of life.

Even though we are overshooting Earth’s carrying capacity, it is not too late to make changes. Our human capacity for thinking long-term, globally, and holistically does not have a great deal of historical evidence, yet such thinking is not beyond our capabilities. 33We can change, and we must do so. Adjusting our thinking to view the long-term consequences of our actions is paramount. Growth needs to be reconsidered as the mantra of our society. Instead, acting within the limits of our Earth’s capacity holds the key to our future well-being and survival.

questions-to-consider

Questions to Consider

  1. What do you think is the most important thing you can do individually and collectively to preserve the diversity of life?

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator and president of the nonprofit Center for Global Awareness. The Center for Global Awareness develops books and materials with a holistic, global focus for adult learners and educators. In 2018, the CGA will launch the Global Awareness Adult Conversation and Study Program, or Gather. In this unique program, adult learners form small study groups to launch conversations about pressing global issues, seeing different perspectives, transcending deep political and cultural divides, and engaging with others to create positive change. Please email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

i “Genuine Progress Indicator,” Redefining Progress. http://www.rprogress.org/sustainability_indicators/genuine_progress_indicator.htm.

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A New National Narrative: Economic Patterns of the Transformative Worldview

In Part 5 of our seven-part series on the transformative worldview, we consider the economic patterns of this worldview. For an introduction to the transformative worldview, please visit Part 1. Part 2 discusses the cultural patterns of the transformative worldview, while Part 3 considers its political patterns and Part 4 its social patterns.

Those holding a transformative worldview believe in creating a more just, equitable, and sustainable economy that places less stress on an overtaxed environment. They are trying to counter the damage from global capitalism and its related values of greed and consumption that have been inflicted upon the human psyche. Many individuals and organizations with a transformative worldview struggle to eliminate free trade agreements such as NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) and the WTO (World Trade Organization), which have wreaked havoc on local economies, workers, small businesses, and the environment, while enriching multinational corporations and their shareholders. 22 Local business, Buckhannon, West Virginia

Some people are working to reinstate bilateral trade agreements, where each trading nation makes its own mutually beneficial trade agreements. Others are working to set up alternative business forms, such as nonprofit businesses, cooperatives, and local, community, or employee-owned enterprises. For example, a committed group of individuals in my local community is working to establish a community-owned bank in which the state and local governments deposit their excess funds. The profits from this enterprise are channeled back into the local community rather than to out-of-state investors. Many people struggle to break the corporate lock on the “economic imagination” and develop diverse enterprises in which workers have a stake in their workplace, and the sustainability of the Earth is given utmost consideration. 23 Green City Growers. a cooperative

Some people argue that we can more effectively deal with the extraordinary rate of economic change by actively participating in life choices and not embracing rampant consumerism. Natural capitalism, which places priority on the well-being and sustainability of the Earth, is among the many economic changes that are emerging. Other significant economic changes include socially responsible investing, social entrepreneurship, micro-credit banking, community development, local businesses, self-managed worker-run enterprises, cooperative enterprises, nonprofit organizations, and disinvestment measures. For example, some people on college campuses are calling on college financial administrators to disinvest their investments from the fossil fuel industry. There is also a renewed call for stricter financial sector regulations, a cap on excessive executive compensation, the breaking up of large corporate holdings, and other reforms.  24 Small Local Loans

One alternative to the globalized economy is the redevelopment of the once-flourishing local or domestic economy. Local community members, government officials, and business owners can alleviate the wealth depletion of the local economy by returning to “economic self-determination.” This return to local capitalism reduces dependency on multinational corporations while creating wealth-accumulating enterprises at the local level. Local economies can produce, market, and process many of their own products for local or regional consumption, reducing transportation and middleman costs. 25

Local capitalism can bring local economies into harmony with the surrounding ecosystem, foster cooperation within the community, and substitute more personalized local products for more expensive imported, and often substandard, goods. In order for such a change to occur, the real effort must come from the local community, which can better utilize available resources in imaginative ways and provide more economical and high-quality food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and energy. A transfer of economic interests and activities from urban, core centers to the local community can reduce dependency on the core and revive local economic vibrancy.i

Concerns are arising over the fact that our industrial form of agricultural production is no longer able to meet the needs of the world’s population. Along with industrial agriculture’s enormous demands for irrigation water, its chemical inputs deplete the fertility of the soil, and its fossil fuel dependency contributes to global warming. Alternatives to mass-produced, industrial agriculture are emerging, such as the rise of sustainable, organic, and local agriculture. An alternative to industrial agriculture, organic farming connects what one eats to how one lives. It also considers the person charged with spraying destructive chemicals on foods and the considerable harm done to his/her health. 26 Organic greenhouse farming

A number of communities scattered throughout the world are working to incrementally achieve the goal of greater local businesses rooted in the community. For example, in the United States, a worker-owned initiative is located in the economically hard-hit city of Cleveland, Ohio. The “Cleveland Model” involves an integrated array of worker-owned cooperative enterprises targeted at the $3 billion purchasing power of such large-scale “anchor institutions” as the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospital, and Case Western Reserve University. The association of enterprises also includes a revolving fund, so that profits made by the businesses help establish new ventures. A worker-owned company, Evergreen Cooperative Laundry, is a state-of-the-art commercial laundry that provides clean linens for area hospitals, nursing homes, and hotels.27 Cleveland Model It includes 50 worker-owners, pays above-market wages, provides health insurance, and is still able to compete successfully against other commercial laundries. Another enterprise, Ohio Cooperative Solar (OCS), provides weatherization services and installs, owns, and maintains solar panels. Each year, two to four new worker-owned ventures are planned for opening. A 20-acre land trust will own the land of the worker-owned businesses.ii A revitalization of the local economy does not mean isolation and a complete rejection of the global capitalist economy, but rather an integration of global and local economies.

Technological Patterns of the Transformative Worldview

Some people supporting a transformative worldview dispute the notion that scientific progress and our faith in technological fixes can solve all complex problems and make the world a better, safer place to live in. Instead, the transformative worldview has a tacit understanding that science, technology, and a consumer-materialistic way of life have certain limitations and repercussions for our human species, as well as for other life forms on Earth. However, most people in the transformative movement realize the importance of internet and computer technology in instantaneously linking and organizing people around the world, while also providing accurate and transparent information.

Even though technology cannot fix all problems, perhaps it can help us deal with some of the urgent issues. But instead of using technology as the latest consumer fad, we need the wisdom to direct the technology to positive ends. As we have found in world history, one thing that humans are good at is making tools. 28Sometimes the repercussions of our tool-making creations are not immediately apparent; the atomic and nuclear bombs come to mind as inventions that have had few, if any, redeeming qualities. But many inventions have been beneficial—the internet has certainly benefited me. Many new innovations are underway to help “clean up” the environment, bring more energy efficiency to our way of life, and treat medical issues. Perhaps technology will provide the tools we need to save ourselves—but we will need to know how to use it in ways that are beneficial rather than harmful.

questions-to-consider

Questions to Consider

  1. What economic changes (if any) do you think should be promoted by those holding a transformative worldview?

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator and president of the nonprofit Center for Global Awareness. The Center for Global Awareness develops books and materials with a holistic, global focus for adult learners and educators. In 2018, the CGA will launch the Global Awareness Adult Conversation and Study Program, or Gather. In this unique program, adult learners form small study groups to launch conversations about pressing global issues, seeing different perspectives, transcending deep political and cultural divides, and engaging with others to create positive change. Please email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

i Wendell Berry, “Decolonizing Rural America,” Audubon 95, no. 2 (March-April 1993): 105.

ii Gar Alperovitz, “America Beyond Capitalism,” Dollars & Sense.

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A New National Narrative: Social Patterns of the Transformative Worldview

Below, in Part 4 of our seven-part blog series on the transformative worldview, we consider the social patterns of this worldview. In Part 1, we introduced the transformative worldview; in Part 2, we considered its cultural aspects; and last week we explored its political perspectives.

Some people adhering to a transformative worldview see the rights of indigenous people, women, non-elites, animals, and the environment as worthy of promoting. Some people earnestly work toward eradicating racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia around the world. Since around the 1990s, for example, LBGT movements, a term that was not in widespread use before 1990, have been achieving human rights for lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender, and transsexual people around the world. The LGBT social movement advocates for the equalized acceptance of LGBT people in society. Although there is not an overarching central organization that represents all LGBT people and their interests, many organizations are active worldwide. Today these movements include political activism and cultural activity, such as lobbying, street marches, social groups, media, art, and research. The 1990s saw a rapid push of the transgender rights movement, and it continues today.

17 LGBT rainbowSome people who promote a transformative worldview believe that education is the key to ushering in alternative changes. Some wish to deinstitutionalize our educational establishments and make our schools diverse, engaging, and beneficial to all, not just to an elite group. They are critical of No Child Left Behind, which they believe overemphasizes testing and “punishes” schools that “fail” to meet arbitrary national standards. Popular among many educators (including this author) are holistic educational practices that encourage diversity, inquiry-based learning, activities that connect with our multiple intelligences, a global perspective, and a holistic world history!

The importance of communal values, rather than an overemphasis on individualism as the central cultural value, is important to many people connecting with the transformative worldview. Emerging social values can be gathered from contemporary culture, from diverse ancient traditions, and from our own imaginations. For example, we can learn to draw upon the wisdom of our elders and their historical insights. Intense individualism is a learned behavior historically created and promoted by Western society, especially the United States. Those who support a transformative worldview believe a shift to a worldview that emphasizes greater cooperative, supportive, and life-enhancing attributes is a viable and necessary alternative. Visionary Mary Clark notes, “We urgently need to reinstate feelings of relatedness and community into our social vision.”i  18 !Kung Elderly Woman

The negative and positive effects of rapid social changes in the 20th century and early 21st century are playing out today. Our society is fraying at the edges because of social fragmentation and alienation. The social structures that are in place in the U.S. today widen the income gap, perpetuate poverty, alienate individuals and families, foster rampant individualism, and encourage the growth of a consumer society at great cost to the environment and individual well-being. When these seemingly intractable problems are looked at from a holistic perspective, they can be addressed more effectively. We are constantly blaming groups or individuals for “causing” these problems: Politicians blame teachers for not educating students satisfactorily, teachers blame parents for not providing a good foundation for education, liberals blame television and social media for “dumbing down” students, and advertisers say to just be “cool,” and all is well. Yet the whole system is out of balance.

The values and beliefs of the modern and globalized worldview govern our social system. Some supporters of the transformative worldview say our society drives us to pursue individual rewards, pleasures, and recognition, while the family, community, and commons are devalued and rendered subservient to the individual. Children are trucked to day-care centers so that parents can earn money in the marketplace, taking them away from the home and their children. Even when there is enough leisure time for family or community enjoyment, it frequently revolves around the marketplace providing platforms for entertainment. The adage “it takes a village to raise a child” has been replaced by “it takes a day care to raise a child.”  19 Extended family, Spain

The indigenous worldview provides valuable insights into societal readjustments. Historically, the band, group, family, village, clan, and tribe have provided mechanisms for human belonging. Humans have a universal, innate sense of wanting to belong to something bigger than just themselves. It is in our deep collective unconscious to live in connection with each other; it has only been recently that we have deviated from this norm. 20 Communal !Kung People

Instead, there has been a shift from community to the individual. This has intensified since the end of World War II and further intensified since the 1980s, when the ideal of the individual reigned supreme. Now rampant individualism has reached a crisis point. Social disengagement and alienation are expressed in the upsurge in the use of anti-depressant drugs, the rash of teen suicides, and an untold number of broken families. For example, from 2001 to 2014 there was a 2.8-fold increase in the total number of prescription-drug-related deaths. We have become untethered from our innate human need—the need to belong.

For individual well-being, those supporting a transformative worldview argue that our social currents need to change to a more equitable, nourishing, and sustainable way of life. 21The good news is that many people recognize this is an urgent issue and are remaking social institutions to foster more community spirit. They are rethinking the self-serving individualism that permeates the values and attitudes of many parts of American and world society. For example, many religious institutions are once again encouraging their places of worship to provide a setting for social interaction and support for their members and others in the community. Changing parts of the system can trigger changes in the whole system. It is a huge challenge, but once awareness is reached, change can come about. Perhaps once again we will be able to claim that it takes a village to raise a child.

questions-to-consider
Questions to Consider

  1. What does the saying “it takes a village to raise a child” mean to you?

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator and president of the nonprofit Center for Global Awareness. The Center for Global Awareness develops books and materials with a holistic, global focus for adult learners and educators. In 2018, the CGA will launch the Global Awareness Adult Conversation and Study Program, or Gather. In this unique program, adult learners form small study groups to launch conversations about pressing global issues, seeing different perspectives, transcending deep political and cultural divides, and engaging with others to create positive change. Please email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

i Mary E. Clark, Ariadne’s Thread: The Search for New Modes of Thinking (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1989), 490-492.

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A New National Narrative: Political Patterns of the Transformative Worldview

In this seven-part blog series, we are exploring the transformative worldview and its many complexities. For an introduction to the transformative worldview, please refer to Part 1 of this series. Last week, we explored the cultural patterns of the transformative worldview, and today we take a look at its political patterns.

The transformative worldview advocates for a decrease in the dominance of the nation-state arrangement. Other political configurations are emerging to challenge or complement the sovereignty of the nation-state. The organization, structure, and services that governments provide for their citizenry are changing markedly because of the shift by many nations from managed capitalism and socialism to neoliberalism and state capitalism. With more wealth concentrated in the hands of the elite, politicians have increasingly supported policies that favor the wealthy. Although the political organization in the U.S. is a republic with democratically elected representatives, increasingly we see that democracy is divided into two contending segments, which I call elite democracy and participatory democracy.  12 Clean elections

Many in the transformative movement favor involvement in participatory democracy for the benefit of all, not elite democracy in which a few wealthy oligarchs dominate the political agenda. For example, a movement for what are called Clean Elections strives to make elections publicly funded from government sources and small constituent donations, instead of from wealthy corporations and individuals who expect favorable responses to their agendas from “their” elected politicians. My hometown of Albuquerque, New Mexico, for instance, passed Clean Election regulations for local elections in 2005 and elected a Clean Election mayor in late 2017.

Peace and justice movements have had renewed vigor since the invention of the internet and social media communication. There are many local peace and justice chapters that encourage local engagement. (For example, I am a member of the Albuquerque Center for Peace and Justice.) 13 no captionBecause millions of people can now be connected instantly, the issues of peace and social and economic justice are garnering attention and action. Among some of the many causes advocated by this diverse movement are democratic reforms, peace efforts, nuclear disarmament, population control, human rights, animal rights, gay rights, equality for non-elites, indigenous people’s rights, women’s and children’s issues, racial equality, and protection from hate crimes. These causes are moral and ethical standards that guide nations’ policies and action. For instance, advocacy groups in the United States are lobbying for a Department of Peace to balance the Department of Defense’s enormous financial outlays and influence.

World institutions and organizations are gaining more authority and legitimacy as they try to complement the authority of the nation-state. During the 20th century, world political institutions evolved that reflected a more interdependent world. One of the first such institutions, the League of Nations, established after World War I in 1920, failed to prevent the outbreak of World War II, although its successor, the United Nations (UN), has proven to be a more successful organization. The UN has a peacekeeping wing to enforce its objectives. International political entities today include nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and world, regional, and citizen-diplomat groups. International organizations, such as the already mentioned UN and the International Court, are charged with the overwhelming task of helping to stamp out terrorism, regulate arms, monitor human rights, prevent disease and hunger, and protect the environment. The WTO, World Bank, and IMF are global institutions charged with governing the global economy. 14 United Nations, New York City

Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are privately created organizations with an international scope, unaffiliated with a particular nation. NGOs transcend narrow national interests in dealing with issues affecting the world and include such well-known world organizations as the Red Cross, Amnesty International, Greenpeace, Doctors Without Borders, and the Human Rights Watch. Many of these organizations have local and state chapters for easy engagement by ordinary citizens. 15 Human Rights Watch, an NGO

Regional political organizations complement national governments. Regional organizations include the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), which has taken on new objectives, along with its primary Cold War goal of protecting Western Europe. The Organization of American States (OAS), established in 1948 with 21 members, is the oldest regional organization of states. The European Union (EU), a regional organization of currently 28 member nations, has achieved a cooperative economy, established its own currency, the euro, and removed tariff barriers for easier trade. 16 Euro symbol, Frankfurt, Germany, photo Denise Ames

Formed in 2001, the African Union has 54 members on the African continent. One of its objectives is the promotion and protection of human rights, such as the right of a group to freely dispose of its natural resources in the exclusive interest of its members. In 1945, Egypt, Jordan, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, and Saudi Arabia signed the Pact of the Arab League States and created the League of Arab States, with 22 members in 2017. The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) has 10 members and was formed in 1967.

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Questions to Consider

  1. Do you think there is a role for the nation-state in a more globalized world? If so, what would its role be?

Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator and president of the nonprofit Center for Global Awareness. The Center for Global Awareness develops books and materials with a holistic, global focus for adult learners and educators. In January 2018, the CGA will launch the Global Awareness Adult Conversation and Study Program, or Gather. In this unique program, adult learners form small study groups to launch conversations about pressing global issues, seeing different perspectives, transcending deep political and cultural divides, and engaging with others to create positive change. Please email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

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A New National Narrative: Cultural Patterns of the Transformative Worldview

In last week’s blog, I discussed the transformative worldview, in which “diverse paths are possible and attainable, and a globalized worldview or other visions of the future are not an inevitable scenario of how the future will or should play out.” Today I will focus on one complex aspect of the transformative worldview: its cultural patterns.

Cultural Patterns of the Transformative Worldview

Many people hold to new and emerging transformative ideals such as cooperation, community, and holistic thinking. “Holistic” means that all the traits of a culture—economic, technological, social, political, religious, ideological, and cultural—interact with and reinforce each other. Holistic thinking also sees the world as an intricately interconnected organism; accentuates uncertainty, approximations, and relativity instead of absolutes; calls for interdependence instead of independence; and recognizes seemingly paradoxical concepts. Highly regarded are Eastern philosophies and religious thought that emphasize cyclical thinking, highlight harmony with nature, and see unity within diversity and diversity within unity.i 08 Gaia, Our Earth

A holistic perspective recognizes that nature, which has been treated for centuries as dead and mechanical, is an animate, invisible organizing power. The Earth, Gaia, is seen as a living organism, interconnected within a web of life. This perspective counters the split between nature and humans, which threatens life on Earth. A holistic view intuits that an underlying consciousness circulates within humans, life on Earth, and the Universe, connecting all into an intricate, interdependent circle of existence.

Some people holding a transformative worldview are embracing alternative forms of spirituality, which depart from the universal religions that arose over 5,000 years ago. The New Age movement, emerging out of the West in the 1960s and 1970s, is an umbrella term that embraces an eclectic array of spiritual beliefs and practices. It encompasses a wide range of personal development strategies and healing tactics to improve human well-being. Deepak Chopra, the spiritual teacher, states that New Age values support conscious evolution, a nonsectarian society, a nonmilitary culture, global sharing, healing the environment, sustainable economies, self-determination, social justice, economic empowerment of the poor, love, and compassion in action. 09 no caption

Some women have resurrected feminist spirituality, which encourages a connection with the sacred feminine and worship of the goddess who they claim has been suppressed by male-dominated universal religions. My cousin, a practicing shaman, performs rituals for clients and friends, such as fire ceremonies, that she contends burn away negative feelings and evil entities, resulting in a cleansing of the soul and renewal of positive energy.

The field of ecopsychology, connecting psychology with ecology, offers many people a way to spiritually connect with Mother Earth. Ecopsychologists maintain that this emotional connection between individuals and the natural world will help them develop sustainable and simple lifestyles and remedy alienation from nature. They support preserving nature on public lands, bringing nature into civic spaces, and connecting nature to their own personal space. Instead of the traditional lawn of green grass and shrubs, my neighbor has a menagerie of native plants that provides a welcome sanctuary for birds and other wildlife. 10

In some ways, postmodernism is part of the transformative worldview. Postmodern thinkers of the 20th century deconstructed the objective, scientific, modern worldview that has held sway for centuries and instead posited that there is no fixed meaning, canon, tradition, or objectivity, only infinity of meaning. This way of thinking erodes classical, rational liberalism, the cornerstone of the modern worldview.ii

Aesthetic expression in a transformative worldview differs from that of the globalized worldview. In many instances, the distance between the observer/observed or entertainer/entertained is reduced or eliminated. A person does not necessarily go to a concert and sit passively as the observer but may participate in the musical production by performing him- or herself or helping with the production. For example, a dancer in the audience might spontaneously participate in the dancing. The professional qualities that make certain artists celebrities are blurred, and the boundaries between the performer and audience fall away. A small, neighborhood theater in Pennsylvania, for example, featured audience participation as they followed sing-along tunes reminiscent of the 1960s television show Sing Along with Mitch. The audience was the performer.  11

Another example is the self-publishing book industry, which has recently skyrocketed. The big publishing houses no longer dictate what will be available to the book-buying public. Instead, individual authors can “self- publish” their own books, freed of restrictions imposed by corporate publishing entities. Also, blogs, tweets, and other forms of social media are not governed by established rules; authors can publish whatever they determine is important to them.

questions-to-consider

Questions to Consider
1.  Do any of the cultural patterns of the transformative worldview resonate with you?


Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator and president of the nonprofit Center for Global Awareness. The Center for Global Awareness develops books and materials with a holistic, global focus for adult learners and educators. In January 2018, the CGA will launch the Global Awareness Adult Conversation and Study Program, or Gather. In this unique program, adult learners form small study groups to launch conversations about pressing global issues, seeing different perspectives, transcending deep political and cultural divides, and engaging with others to create positive change. Please email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

i Fritjof Capra, The Turning Point:  Science, Society, and the Rising Culture (Toronto: Bantam Books, 1982), 21-53.

ii Norman F. Kantor, American Century: Varieties of Culture in Modern Times (New York: HarperCollins, 1997), 425-431.

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A New National Narrative: The Transformative Worldview

For the first time in human evolution, the individual life is long enough, and the cultural transformation swift enough, that the individual mind is now a constituent player in the global transformation of human culture. … – William Irwin Thompson

In the last two blogs of 2017, I outlined the unsettling times we are currently experiencing in the United States and much of Europe. There is a populist attack on the Liberalism (not associated with the Democratic Party) that has been entrenched in the psyche of the American citizenry. Liberalism pulls from the traditions of the European Enlightenment, which includes the principles of an open society, democracy, freedom of speech and religion, individual rights and dignity, fairness and justice, checks and balances on governments’ authority, scientific reasoning, and a free-market economy. Populism is displacing Liberalism as a guiding narrative of the American story. But as I have outlined in the last two blogs, populism is fraught with problems.

I suggested that we need a new national narrative. I will describe my vision of a new national narrative in the next several blogs. I call this new narrative a transformative worldview.

An Introduction to the Transformative Worldview

At this point in time, millions of diverse people around the world are actively calling for a different worldview. Some say a different story is urgently needed to assure the continuation of our human species and life as we know it on Earth. Some people in diverse fields—educators, religious leaders, business entrepreneurs, international political leaders, indigenous farmers, political activists, politicians, environmentalists, entertainers, scientists, working people, artists, writers, small business owners, academics, economists, concerned citizens, and many others—are contributing to the creation of what I call a transformative worldview. 01 Our Earth

Those who adhere to a transformative worldview, at least in part, imagine that diverse paths are possible and attainable, and a globalized worldview or other visions of the future are not an inevitable scenario of how the future will or should play out. They are promoting alternative ideas and diverse options for a different worldview and voicing their convictions in a forceful, yet usually peaceful, fashion.

Elements in the formation of a transformative worldview come from diverse sources; some are positive aspects of the four other worldviews (see Five Worldviews). For example, highly regarded from the indigenous worldview is the wisdom of indigenous people who call upon the wise council of their elders, respect and connect with nature, draw on the support of extended family, and value the strong relationship with territorial place. 02 Wise elders, !Kung woman, Africa photo Izla BardavidFrom the modern worldview are gleaned the ideal of liberal democracy, the advancement of scientific inquiry, medical improvements, beneficial technological innovations, public-supported mass education, and progress in the expansion of human rights to include women and people of color. All are noteworthy accomplishments. From the fundamentalist worldview come the close connection to family and community and the recognition of a greater power than individualism alone. The stunning technological developments from the globalized worldview, especially high-speed, integrated computer networks, and reasonably-priced global transportation have provided instantaneous communication, linking diverse people around the globe. Even some indigenous people in remote villages are linked to the internet and use appropriate scientific knowledge for enhancing their own goal of self-sufficiency in food consumption. And some would say that the globalized worldview’s vision of “opening up” the world to unfettered trade has benefited many people with a more materially comfortable standard of living than ever before experienced. 03 Computer technology in Rwanda, Africa

All of these worldviews have some positive contributions in creating a different worldview, but those advancing a transformative worldview believe that there needs to be selectivity and mindfulness in fitting the values of the four other worldviews into a new framework. Therefore, a different worldview needs to continue its evolution and offer alternatives to prevailing notions of cultural uniformity, rigid fundamentalism, corporate dominance, consumer-driven values, selfish individualism, oligarchic concentration of wealth and power, political stalemate, and environmental destruction. Even though those who embrace a transformative worldview have a diverse array of thoughts, beliefs, ideas, theories, lifestyles, choices, and actions that defy rigid categorization, they do share common principles and ideals that I have placed under the umbrella of a transformative worldview.

The transformative worldview is still a minority view, but it is a worldwide movement in which millions of people are reassessing the values of the other worldviews in order to find a more compassionate, equal, sustainable, and community-focused value system. I have organized 10 characteristics that briefly describe the emerging transformative worldview in the U.S. and across the world.

The Transformative Worldview: 10 Characteristics

1. Interdependent Ideals are emerging that focus on interdependence, cooperation, community, connections, support, and altruism rather than greed, aggression, independence, and segmentation. Other descriptors of the transformative worldview include simultaneity, uncertainty, relationships, networks, webs, integration, and diversity. 04

2. Community-Focused Social Values draw upon the wisdom of our elders and their experiential insights. Intense individualism is a learned, aggressive behavior, historically created and promoted by Western society, especially the U.S. A shift to a worldview emphasizing greater cooperative, supportive, and life-enhancing attributes is a viable alternative.

3. Natural Capitalism places priority on the well-being and sustainability of the Earth. It includes socially responsible investing, social entrepreneurship, micro-credit banking, community development, local businesses, self-managed worker-run enterprises, cooperatives, nonprofit organizations, and other forms of management in which individuals have a vested interest in profitability and outcomes. 05 Organic greenhouse farming

4. Ecological Awareness has awakened our insight into the interdependence of everything in nature, where every event has an effect on everything else. Humans are part of the mystery of the Universe and not isolated, separate, and superior entities.

5. Renewable Energy in the form of wind, solar, water, steam, and others is important in countering the dire effects of climate change and stimulating economic development. The devastation caused by a fossil fuel-dependent lifestyle has galvanized world citizens to start shifting from oil and coal dependence to sustainable energy.

6. Peace and Justice Movements connect millions of people instantly with worldwide communication networks. These vigorous movements include democratic reforms, peace efforts, nuclear disarmament, population control, human rights, animal rights, LGBTQ rights, environmental issues, educational reforms, equality, rights for indigenous people, women’s and children’s rights, and others.

7. Sustainable Agriculture is a shift from industrial agricultural that is no longer able to meet the world’s food needs to local and organic farming. 06 Sustainable agriculture, Mexico photo Denise Ames

8. Holistic Health offers alternatives to Western medicine, which is often dominated by a for-profit pharmaceutical industry and invasive medical procedures. It encourages health, well-being, a mostly plant-based diet, and a holistic way to cure diseases ranging from cancer to heart disease.

9. Spirituality includes alternative practices that differ from traditional religious practices. Many traditional religions have accommodated the desire expressed by many people for more connected and personal spiritual experiences, rather than rote adherence to prescribed creeds and rituals. 07 no caption

10. Holistic Education is the key to ushering in alternative changes. Holistic educational practices for adults and youths encourage multi-culturalism, open-mindedness and diversity, inquiry-based learning, multiple intelligences, a global perspective, and a holistic world history!

The transformative worldview is further explained through six patterns—cultural, political, social, economic, technological, and ecological—that I will describe in blog two of this four-part series.


Dr. Denise R. Ames is a long-time educator and president of the nonprofit Center for Global Awareness. The Center for Global Awareness develops books and materials with a holistic, global focus for adult learners and educators. In January 2018, the CGA will launch the Global Awareness Adult Conversation and Study Program, or Gather. In this unique program, adult learners form small study groups to launch conversations about pressing global issues, seeing different perspectives, transcending deep political and cultural divides, and engaging with others to create positive change. Please email info@global-awareness.org or visit www.global-awareness.org for more information.

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